1918:LOCAL MINING BUST COMES WITH THE END OF WWI

In addition to the mining and agricultural bust that hit Boulder hard as WWI ended, the Spanish Flu epidemic took many lives, putting increased pressure on the community. Need was growing among families unable to meet their most basic needs, and with nowhere to turn for help.


It was under these social circumstances that Allice Fulton traveled from Denver in March 1918 to pay a visit to a private organization known as the Associated Charities of Boulder. This is the seed from which EFAA grew.

Neighbors, the local faith community and the Colorado Association of Women’s Clubs came together in 1918 to create an organization to help mothers and children, and people “unable to help themselves” with things like food, coal and basic household goods. The organization, later renamed the Emergency Family Assistance Association, was initially called Social Service Child Welfare Association of Boulder, and was run by Hellen Fisher for the first 15 years.