1960s:WHOLE FAMILY APPROACH & COMMUNITY COLLABORATION TO MEET NEED

EFAA focused on taking a whole-family approach as a way of helping children more effectively, knowing that assistance to the entire family can create a better home environment.


Edith Embrey, EFAA’s executive secretary, looks on as 6 brothers prepare for a dental exam in Louisville. Dental costs were the largest single expense for EFAA at the time, accounting for 20% of the total budget.

In 1961,

the business administration of EFAA was absorbed by the United Way, with donations from the community and other organizations running through United Way. Total public financial support, including United Way contributions, was $12,072. Total expenses were $11,055. Additionally, $20,000 worth of food, medical/dental assistance, shoes and clothing, transportation, rent and lodging were distributed thanks to in-kind donations from local individuals and organizations. Later, EFAA would return to managing its own business administration, completely separate from the United Way. Today, Foothills United Way provides EFAA with small grants for select projects.

Mrs. Edith Embrey, the organization’s executive secretary at the time, worked closely with teachers, school nurses, doctors, dentists, the county court and police department to identify and help about 800 to 1,000 people each year.


In 1961,

the Boulder Daily Camera ran a series of articles about EFAA and other United Way funding recipients. One article sought to illustrate the different scenarios families faced before coming to EFAA for help.

“Somebody’s saying – it’s a cop, too – ‘What’s the matter?’ And before you can stop him, the youngest one pipes up, ‘We’re hungry!’ Turns out the policeman has a heart, and an answer. One quick call, and there you are: the whole family fed, cleaned up, installed in a warm hotel room for the night. Something called Child Welfare [the name under which EFAA was operating at the time] turned the miracle…”

“‘Look ma, I can see!’ Glasses paid for by Child Welfare [the name under which EFAA was operating at the time], changed a school-hater into an outstanding student. Considering the difference in his social adjustment, in his whole life, in his making a contribution instead of becoming a burden to society as he grows up, these glasses were a real bargain…”

“It’s getting dark, and chilly. You’re stranded in a strange town with a wife and three hungry kids. You spent your last change at noon, buying candy bars for all of them – not a balanced meal, but it was the cheapest way to quiet their hunger. You look at the passing faces on the street, as you walk around looking for a more or less sheltered place to sleep. Maybe some of these people would help, if they knew – but what if you asked someone and he said “no”? You’ve never had to ask for that kind of help before.”


EFAA Articles of Incorporation

In 1962,

EFAA (still operating under the name Social Service Child Welfare Association of Boulder) was officially incorporated. According to the articles of incorporation, the purpose of this Association was “to render social service and relief to indigent and destitute people of Boulder, Colorado and to aid in the mental, moral, and physical growth of the children of Boulder, Colorado, in cooperation with other relief agencies of the state, county and community to promote these aims.”